Seeing Beneath the Surface

Photographer Charlie Crane’s book, Welcome to Pyongyang, contains a series of stunning large format photos of one of the world’s most secretive countries. Visitors to North Korea are accompanied at all times by state-assigned guides who escort you on carefully planned tours. How can you create under such tight restrictions? Crane’s solution is straightforward: “If there is no possibility of getting underneath the surface then the answer is to photograph the surface itself.” Even though the state has carefully controlled what outsiders can see, these remarkable images speak for themselves about life in the Hermit Kingdom.

Suite Idea

The great minds at Pantone are at it again. Now you can eat, sleep, and breathe color at the Pantone Hotel in Brussels, Belgium. Created to appeal to itinerant designers and other creative professionals, this hotel takes picking your room to colorful new heights. Each floor displays a distinct color palette and walls are adorned with photos and oversize PMS chips. Contributed by GCF intern, Rebecca Madariaga

Accidental tourist 2.0

Panoramic views of the pyramids

Have you ever longed to see the Great Pyramids, St. Petersburg, Angor Wat, or the Vatican but just didn’t have the opportunity? Now there is a way to sit back, relax, and start traveling virtually. Airpano.com offers incredibly detailed aerial panoramic views of some of the most fascinating places on earth. The clarity is stunning, and the 360º angles show you details that you could not see even in person. Take a peek, but be forewarned, this website is addictive!